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« A Nuance on the Burning Platforms Memo - Nokia Board and Nokia Chairman Reprimanded Elop For That Mistake | Main | Bloodbath Year Four, Smartphones Galore - Q3 Results, all market shares »

November 13, 2013

Comments

Seurahepo

@Minna

"USA has no "God-given right" to being a leader in the technology. You never did"

True, the right is not god given. USA is leader in many things technology because of synergy. Especially Silicon Valley with its existing tech companies, investors, universities and enterprising culture is a BIG deal, there are similar smaller hubs in other parts of the USA too. In addition to that, mass media and popular culture (of western world) is very US centric. If something is big in USA you'll hear about it.

For a phone maker, like Nokia, US market is more important than the dollar or unit share would directly suggest. If your platform is not present in US market, the US startups (facebooks, instagrams, snapchats and Twitters) won't support your platform, you don't have the hot apps and the platform seems less than interesting. The same thing with media, they don't see your phones, nor will they review them. That will form opinions outside US too.

Nokia was out of the high end US market for years, and they might have been in for problematic times even if their Symbian and Meego platfoms would have been more competitive and in time. But they weren't even that.

RottenApple

The US market is still not important enough to sacrifice the rest of the world for it.

As for ignorant American dipshit companies - fuck'em if they don't get what's going on outside their own little island. A worldwide operating company needs to be aware of what's going on worldwide - otherwise they may find themselves becoming obsolete rather sooner than later. In this context: If Facebook would ignore a mobile platform that's popular in Europe but virtually non-existent in the US, not supporting that platform wouldn't hurt the platform, it'd hurt Facebook. But this seems to be something American economic 'experts' will never understand.

And of course, if everybody just kowtows before The Mighty American Economy, some things just become a self fulfilling prophecy. And that's probably part of what happened at Nokia. Some people were looking with horror at the US market and completely forgot that they were market leader in the rest of the world. So, they set out on a mission to conquer the US - and the end result is that they not only didn't succeed, no, they also lost everything they had.

B a r o n 9 5

@Rotten "If Facebook would ignore a mobile platform that's popular in Europe but virtually non-existent in the US, not supporting that platform wouldn't hurt the platform, it'd hurt Facebook."

LOL - seriously?

Because - EXACTLY the OPPOSITE has been proven truth.

Facebook completely ignored Symbian, and did custom apps for iOS then Android. Facebook flourished. Symbian died. Same for virtually every other Internet service. The reason Symbian died and Maemo never went anywhere and Bada never went anywhere and Meego would never go anywhere is PRECISELY because developers of US popular Internet services didn't do apps for them.

But all that is a moot point. Now that the GSM cartel induced bubble is over, there will never again be a mobile ecosystem from Europe that is popular. So you can't run the experiment again.

But all the times in the past the experiment was run, it was Symbian and Nokia begging the Facebooks and Instagrams of the world to port their apps. Not the other way around.

Nice try at trying to deny obvious facts. You are learning well from Tomi.

Too bad the sheriff of factual information is in town, huh? :)

zlutor

"Turner will then reportedly be replaced with Stephen Elop in two to three years, which we already know what his “big plans” for Microsoft are.: http://www.ubergizmo.com/2013/11/microsofts-new-temporary-ceo-expected-to-be-kevin-turner-report/"

Nice game to play... :-(

"Facebook completely ignored Symbian, and did custom apps for iOS then Android. Facebook flourished. Symbian died." Any real conjunction? Ignoring (hundreds of) millions of users - still? C'mon...

Not to mention
- there is offical FB app for Symbian published by Facebook itself: http://store.ovi.com/publisher/Facebook
- FB is natively integrated into UX of N9 (part of notification center, etc)

So, if you refer to something, make a quick look up before...

"Same for virtually every other Internet service. The reason Symbian died and Maemo never went anywhere and Bada never went anywhere and Meego would never go anywhere is PRECISELY because developers of US popular Internet services didn't do apps for them."

All these kind of services support ALL platforms reaching enough people. Doesn't really matter whether it is US West Coast, Mumbai or Helsinki made. Google supported all big/promising platforms - yes, Symbian and meeGo included, even WP! No service provider can be stupid not to support any popular platform.

E.g. S40 - a.k.a Asha - does it ring the bell? There is even dedicated FB button on some models. Is it popular in US? I hardly believe so...

paul

What Tommi forgets, when he credits Elop with the turn around in Nokia Networks is that the division was a joint venture and had to be run "at arms length". There were always Siemens people around who would have reported an attempt to destroy the company back to their father company. Whilst these were the same idiots that paralysed all decision making, it at least blocked the most crazy destruction. This meant that Rajeev had the money that NSN was making and more a free hand to fix things than would have been if Elop had been able to interfere more.

Remember also that Rajeev was put in place before Elop and his ilk joined Nokia.

www.youtube.com

My brother suggested I might like this web site. He was entirely right. This publish truly made my day. You can not believe simply how much time I had spent for this information! Thanks!

jaro

I immediately got this old Dilbert comic in mind in Feb 2011:

http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/1996-04-21/

kram felix

Change your blog name to "I hate Elop". Just a thought.

Mark

This whole report is, to be blunt, sheer idiocy. I'm sure interested readers will already have realised that Nokia was, by every metric, already on a one way ticket to oblivion and Elop got them out just in time. However, your excellently misleading graphs are nicely weighted to show exactly what you want to show, rather than the reality. Bravo. A tour de force in skulduggery. Congratulations, you, on such an insightful piece of analysis. You are a true a legend in your own lunchtime.

Heikki

I can see Paul is an asshole

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