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« Open Letter to Nokia Shareholders | Main | Failure Version 2: Nokia Lumia Relaunch with Windows Phone 8 is Also a Total Dud (Updated) »

August 28, 2012

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lost

Just to be clear, I suggested 'average' values because I think 'top computer makers list' should be valued by how much 'computing value' they delivered to customers.

Thus ranking should satisfy following:
1) if one vendor sells same number of same type devices as other vendor, it should be counted equal, regardless if one vendor was able to get more revenue due to better brand, marketing etc. Example, if IBM sell 100K servers and HP sell 100k servers, but IBM get 50% more revenue, I consider them equal. Or if Apple sell 10M phones, Samsung sell 10M phones, but Apple has 50% more revenue AND 70% more profit, I still consider them same from point of 'top computer makers' - they all made same 'amount of computer value' for us , customers

2) but if one vendor sells one smartphone and other vendor sells one server, I do not consider them equal, since vendor that sold server delivered more 'computing value' to customer

It is easy to see that counting units sold nicely satisfy #1, and thus I always prefer seeing comparisons in sold units of smartphones, as opposed to revenuer or even worse, profits.

But its easy to see that #2 is NOT satisfied by number of units, and is better satisfied by revenues - although revenues fail at #1.

Therefore BEST approach, that satisfy both criteria, is to define average value for specific class of device, and then multiply number of units sold by those average value numbers. Device classes are more or less obvious, Tomi mentioned them in article, and I also listed them in previous post: smartphones, tablets, notebooks, desktops, servers, mainframes. In future you could add 'Smart TV' after tablets etc.

By using industry wide average number, if Apple sold 10M smartphones, Samsung sold 12M smartphones and IBM sold 100k servers, and average industry values are 200$ per smartphone, 100k$ per server, then you rank IBM as first with 10B$, Samsung as 2nd with 2.4B$ and Apple as 3rd with 2B$. Numbers are imaginary and incorrect, and just used for example.

Eurofan

Tomi et al.:

From a recent Wall Street Journal article: "Despite the difficulties, Finns have continued to buy into Nokia's stock. Finns—both private individuals and institutions—owned 24% of Nokia's total share capital at the end of June this year, up from 16% before Mr. Elop announced his new strategy in early 2011."

coques iphone 4

The iPhone 5 isn't flawless. The hardware is not really the problem, but a lack of OS improvements. The saying used to be Apple knew what we wanted before we did. The current truth is its customers are much more informed in regards to technology and the industry.

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Goal focused preparing is always needed.

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