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July 06, 2012

Comments

KM

What Nokia push?

The one Symbian got? Or Maemo? Most people I talked to never even heard of Maemo or MeeGo. Nokia did some truly great advertisement here if the systems were this obscure.
Sorry, but I don't think that would have ever happened.

And no, I'm not based in the US. I'm from Germany. We still got a few contracts for WP7 versions of some apps.
We even got more demand for Bada than for Symbian.

Oh, and BTW, Nokia did not do well before Elop. The signs of trouble just haven't materialized yet in a way that would be visible in the typical business report - but they were definitely there. Symbian would have tanked in 2011 even without burning the platform. It just wouldn't have tanked as badly but it would NOT be the system with the largest market share now. See Blackberry for a similar problem.

new_guy

I'm am not a business person, so if I am wrong someone please correct me.

I think the board of directors and Elop are trying to destroy Nokia to hand it over to M$
From wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Board_of_directors
"In a stock corporation, the board is elected by the stockholders and is the highest authority in the management
of the corporation."

Nokia shareholders
http://www.gurufocus.com/InsiderBuy.php?symbol1=nok&Submit=Go
Name----------------------------Number of shares
Dodge & Cox---------------------84,140,243
Brian Rodgers-------------------7,500,000
Jim Simmons---------------------3,374,400
Jeff Auxier---------------------15,300
Charles Brandes-----------------353,206
Manning & Napier Advisors, Inc--222,151
Chris Davis---------------------307,874
John Rogers---------------------20,094
Ken Fisher----------------------18,740

M$ shareholders
http://www.gurufocus.com/InsiderBuy.php?symbol1=msft&Submit=Go
All the guys above have MSFT stock as well.

Tom Right

I really really would love to know what Bill Gates thought when he realized that he will get all of Nokias cash to spend on his WP program.

elm70

@new_guy

Bravo !

I'm saying it since ages.
Yes, 3 American Funds did declared to own over 5% of Nokia around the time Elop did start to make strange actions inside Nokia
These are Dodge & Cox, Capital Group, and JP Morgan each of them own over 5% of Nokia just in time for last vote for Nokia BoD

I think what it is done in Nokia is illegal, and Elop is a criminal like most of BoD in Nokia.

The 11.2 and the 16.4, are two clear action to support Microsoft at Nokia costs.

Everywhere in the world, Elop would be in jail or in a tomb ... but not in Finland.

Finish people are also the only one in the world buying the useless Nokia Lumia ... that's amazing .. instead of bring into court Elop and his friends, instead of boycott Nokia Lumia ... they are also the only people in the world that are buying Lumia

Tchuss

e_lm_70

ps: In practice billions of euro of welfare have been moved from Finland and Europe to US. A massive crime, bigger then the MadOff crime.

zlutor

@CN: http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/show/300097

“I only believe in statistics that I doctored myself” ― Winston Churchill

:-)

Martin Nilsson

A very interesting read even if the view that Symbian was successful is questionable in my view. You look at Q/Q volumes in Q4/10 which always are up due to the Christmas seasonality for Nokia. Looking at the Y/Y trend in Q4/10 Nokia’s Symbian sales grew 13% Y/Y which was the lowest growth for the year. Also as ASP fell sharply for Nokia’s Symbian range it is not really correct to look at volumes as Symbian lost quickly in the high-end. Apple grew sales over 100% Y/Y and Samsung grew its Smartphone sales over 500% Y/Y the same quarter. So, I would say that Symbian has a lot of issues before the Burning Platform memo. Also, as an old microkernel OS it is very cumbersome and costly to develop and innovate on versus the Linux/Unix based OS. Would the company be better off with a migration to MeeGo/Qt or Android? Clearly yes, in my view.

Mark

A bit off-topic, but there's a scary graph in this page showing the change in smartphone platform distribution (for sales I guess) in China, Q12011 to Q12012.
http://english.analysys.com.cn/article.php?aid=135148

Symbian goes from 42.5% to 11.8% - although still nearly as big as the total of everything non-Android.

BTW The history was good fun, though I was surprised by the discovery that Finland had a civil war.

Martin Nilsson

A very interesting read even if the view that Symbian was successful is questionable in my view. You look at Q/Q volumes in Q4/10 which always are up due to the Christmas seasonality for Nokia. Looking at the Y/Y trend in Q4/10 Nokia’s Symbian sales grew 13% Y/Y which was the lowest growth for the year. Also as ASP fell sharply for Nokia’s Symbian range it is not really correct to look at volumes as Symbian lost quickly in the high-end. Apple grew sales over 100% Y/Y and Samsung grew its Smartphone sales over 500% Y/Y the same quarter. So, I would say that Symbian has a lot of issues before the Burning Platform memo. Also, as an old microkernel OS it is very cumbersome and costly to develop and innovate on versus the Linux/Unix based OS. Would the company be better off with a migration to MeeGo/Qt or Android? Clearly yes, in my view.

Huber

@KM:

It is true that Symbian already was struggling in Germany in 2010. I bought the X6 more than 2 years ago, and after buying the original Galaxy Tab a few months later, I saw how outdated the UI of Symbian was. I also saw how bad the browser was. Opera Mini was better, but far behind other Android browsers.

But there was one huge advantage for Nokia: It just worked!

In my company almost every employee has a company car. If you ever had a newer Mercedes, Audi or VW (or a BMW with Snap-in-adapter SAP), you know that the best bluetooth handsfree-connection is rSAP.

My Nokia X6 had rSAP. My SGS2 had one with GB, but with ICS rSAP was removed. I had to spend a whole Sunday afternoon to root my Android Phone and to install another rSAP-App. Not speaking of manually exchanging system-files, so that I actually can see my contacts in my BMW. Nokias always just worked in my various cars.

In 2010, most of my colleagues hence hat Nokia phones. Now everybody has switched to Android or Apple instead.

Had Nokia released the N9 in 2011 with full support from the management and rSAP, I most probably would have an N9 now. Heck, even if they had released the N9 without rSAP, but promised an update later on, I would have jumped on board and use handsfree instead for a few months!

But never ever will I buy a Windows Phone, thank you very much Elop.

Hell, 2 years ago some colleagues have told me that for them, iOS and Android are toys for children. They prefered their Nokias. Now this has turned 180 degrees by now - nobody I know, privately or business-related, is interested in a Nokis Lumia. But I have met people at customers who enjoyed their N9 - much more open than iOS and you don't have Google grabbing your data.

So from my point of view, it would have been much more intelligent to introduce Meego-based phones in Germany instead of Lumias.

Nokia would just have to keep the strengths of Symbian (rSAP, openness, lots of functionality) while getting rid of the UI's weaknesses.

But instead Elop introduced phones with a shiny UI and no serious functionality at all. Very clever indeed!

elm70

@ HUber @ Mark @ Martin

Yes, Symbian success is questionable.
Already OPK announcing Nokia N8 the best seller symbian, he made clear it was going to be the last Symbian. The future for top Nokia phone was planed for MeeGo.
So, yes, Symbian was getting old, was slow on update, but feature wise was still a good OS, open and with lot of functionalities.

If Symbian is questionable.

Windows Phone it is not questionable.

Windows Phone like Windows Mobile is and was all the time a total disaster Mobile OS.
Poor in features, close, with huge limitation.

Tchuss

e_lm_70

ps: Excluding Nokia 808 PureView, the last real new Nokia Symbian is Nokia 700-600-500 from August 2011, that are just a restyle of the old Nokia C7 ... with Symbian stuck to 640x360 screen like the old 2007 Nokia 5800 .. so ... yes Symbian was losing traction, but Nokia did stop investing on it since ages

Earendil Star

@ KM

Did Nokia push Symbian before THT Elop? Was Nokia ready to push Meego with the N9 / N950 before THT Elop?
Never heard of Maemo, Meego?

Ehm, are you a mobile professional? Do you have contacts with mobile professionals?
Either you and your contacts aren't, or you mainly are a MS / WM / WP developer.
By the way, sorry that your customers wasted their time on WP7.

Have you ever heard of Samsung? Yeah, the company that most closely resembled Nokia?
How did they fare in the meantime? My humble opinion is that they fared quite well.
So, stop the comparisons to RIM, which has nothing to do with Nokia.
RIM based its success on one platform and service offering (BB), and thereafter failed to execute (BB10 still not ready).
Nokia had scores of form factors WW to capitalize on, and lots of options, just like Samsung. They had their N9 and transition path.
The only difference is that Nokia chose to bet its future on... WP7 ONLY!
[A mobile OS that MS declared dead a couple of weeks ago, just a couple of months after the Lumia 900 launch (which supposedly was the "first true WP7 flagship").]

Betting the farm on WP7 was a THT Elop decision exclusively*. This had nothing to do with Symbian or Maemo/Meego and past management actions.
And this is what killed Nokia. Everything else is useless propaganda circulated only to distract from the real issues.

And you know it very well, don't you?

Please note: THT Elop is referenced, as always, to represent the whole current Nokia management (Board included).
He is the current Nokia figurehead, so he gets this honour.

Musti

Nokia was in trouble because it didn't execute. The engineers were like open-source boy scouts on a picnic. They lacked the vision, they lacked the strategy, they lacked the roadmap. Yes, they were not altruistic open source hippies, working for free, oh no! They were paid +6k€ / month just for being on an ego-trip.

A little linux there, a little symbian there, a little mer there, a little qt there, a little some obscure framework also there.... and a lots of bonuses, free coffee, "developer" holidays, seminars, conferences..... Yawn the clock is already 4 p.m. must hurry home, nice surfing the whole day... see you guys tomorrow at the Office !!

Those years are now over. Good Riddance !

vladkr

@Musti:

6K+/month engineers are now replaced by 500K+/year directors and executives, who obviously don't know telecoms' world (one from HP, another from MS, another is just a former president's son...)

Does it work better than with lazy 6k/month engineers? It surely doesn't.

Even the head of the board is not a Telecom guy, but someone who made its wealth on Windows' failures, and who will certainly sell anti-viruses/anti spywares/anti-anything for Windows Phone.

Musti

You're right, but at Samsung that just does not work, as the people are really committed to make top consumer electronics. They come to work to win every day!

Nokia rather lets lazy engineers make huge salaries (should be past tense, as they did let them have those huge salaries - not anymore), than organize enough space for the workers making base stations as the work conditions there (NSN) are poor.

Tomi T Ahonen

To all in the thread..

I ran a Twitter contest for 24 hours, to collect best summaries of this blog, from 30,000 words into 140 characters. You may enjoy some of the hilarious comments among them..

Cheers!

Tomi Ahonen :-)

Jonathan Abbey

The movie you meant to cite about 'ELE' is not 'Contact', but rather 'Deep Impact'.

Loved the article.

N900 owner

It doesn't matter if Tomi writes 30.000 or 1.000.000 words. I'm still not convinced, that there was or is a better strategy for Nokia than switching to WP. Every analyst knew that 2012 would be a very hard and difficult year for Nokia and that a turnaround in 2013 is far from certain.

But repeating the words Symbian, Meego, QT or Meltemi a thousand times doesn't change the fact, that these are not competitive smartphone ecosystems in the moment. Even the future of Bada and Tizen is at least questionable (Muratzin said Bada is dead, but that doesn't have to be the truth of course).

Windows Phone is competitive. It is not yet a market success, but it is competitive and it has a strong outlook with the convergence of W8 on Desktop, XBox, Tablets and Phones.

It will be a very interesting year 2013 on this blog ;-)

Winter

Tomi,

I am puzzled. To me, it seems obvious that ex-Microsofti Elop was hired migrate Nokia to MS WinPhone.

That is how it always goes when companies hire ex-MS CEO's.

But who in the board had decided this "buy-out" was profitable, even for himself?

Who actually believed that this would be good for Nokia at all, given the history of MS & Partners? The $1B MS gave to Nokia is a fraction of the worth of Nokia in 2010.

An who decided that there should be no plan B and let Elop destroy any alternative?

Ex-nokia guy from Tampere

There is no denying the fact that Symbian was too complicated OS for developers. Nokia had years and years time to rewote it, but it didn't. That was Nokia's big mistake. Instead they made already complex system even more complex by focusing on security. While they shuld have focused on making it more user and developer-friendly.

But Elop did not make correct decisions either. Nokia should have continued with several platforms and expand its business to other areas, such as integrating mobile features with home appliances. In that area there are really big possibilities...

Bloodymirova

@Louis

Whatsapp for N9: http://wazapp.im/

Dropbox is in fact integrated into N9 after the PR 1.2 but if you want a client, there are at least 2: Dropian and DropN9

I also use Nelisquare instead of Foursquare official app, which is not in the app store either. You just need to search for it. That's the beauty of open source :)

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