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« Mobile is the Magical Measurement Machine - Role of Mobile in Big Data Future: now cameraphone used in anything from measuring bra size to counting trees | Main | Quick Links to the Most Popular Major Statistics in Mobile and Digital »

October 08, 2014

Comments

Winter

"The same survey also found that the average UK smartphone user looks at their phone for 3 hours per day - thats 18.8% of total waking hours we now have our eyes on the small screen."

Just look around you when riding public transport. Half the people are looking at their phones for the whole journey.

I saw the same in China four years ago. But then it was less than "half" then.

Troed Sangberg

Perfect. Updating a slide for tomorrow's talk referencing this statistic right now ;) Thanks Tomi.

Andrew Brown

I don't look at my phone 221 times a day. In fact I look at it less than one time a year! About three years ago I lost the charger to my phone. I still had a 'cigarette lighter' charger for my car which I would use to charge it. Then, in the middle of winter, I declined to head out in the cold and plug the damned thing in. A day led to a week which led to three years. I haven't touched a bloody cell phone for over three years now and I can promise you its the best development in my life that I could imagine. If people want to contact me they email me or call on my land line. I respond to everyone with alacrity - and I don't need the perverse accoutrement of a cell phone to do it.

I'm 47 and live in New Zealand. I bought my first cell phone at age 21. For the next 23 years I had a charged and ready phone in my pocket. What a stupid thing to do.

I value my time. I don't value a ringing phone. People can get hold of me when they need me and that is all that counts. The whole 'cell phone' culture of the western world is both ugly and perverse. I bet everyone has seen people at a nice restaurant - looking at their cell phones - texting or doing some other kind of rubbish rather than engaging with their companions.

Get rid of the damn thing - you won't regret it and you may wind up with a few extra shekels in your pocket as well.

AppleTurfer

I'm sure I'm among those looking 221 times a day, and if not, it's only because I am staring at my iPhone screen (reading a book, watching a show, twitter, web browsing, news app) for long periods of time.

As my phone is a work tool with corporate apps and email, as well as personal, I have to have a password. The TouchId on the iPhone has been a godsend. Just rest my thumb or finger on it for half a heart beat and I'm in. Securely and conveniently...221 times a day.

John F.

Dear Tomi,

A few days after Samsung announcing probably the biggest profit collapse we read nothing about it while 2 minutes after the Iflop was presented we had a complete analysis of why apple watch would flop

Samsung is of great interest to many of us here, business wise it represents for many the way we earn our bread and butter.

What is your take on four quarters of profit decline and how it will affect the mobile market?

You are good at predicting, illuminate us please.

thanks

JF

Gonzo

@john F

Do not expect a quick respose over samsung, it has been a pillar of a great example on how to excecute well and now that it's over it's hard to accept that market share has once again failed as an strategy. Remember compaq, nokia, etc?

This week samsung pulled out of Europe with their notebooks too... Luckily they sell tv sets, toasters and microwaves.

They never understood that copying apple hardware was not the key to long term success.

Some factors that will lead to irrelevance:

The absence of a software platform fully within its control
The absence of control over an ecosystem of content and apps
The absence of services
The lack of integration of software, services and hardware
The absence of differentiation vis-a-vis other vendors
The indefensibility of its low end offerings from low end disruptors
The pattern of commoditization in all its markets

Samsung now enters Tomi's famous bloodbath race to the bottom, it will take some time but it reached the point of no return

abdul muis

@John F

Actually Tomi already post about samsung, but in the post, not in the article. Here is the link
http://communities-dominate.blogs.com/brands/2014/09/time-for-some-told-ya-so-about-iphone-is-anyone-this-accurate/comments/page/6/#comments

(the first comment on page 6)

rephair

actually nice comments here all agree

Paul Ionescu

@TomiAhonen

Hei Tomi! Any thoughts about Apple's new SIM?

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2835452/apple-sim-has-great-potential-but-widespread-changes-will-take-time.html

KPOM

GOP wins 52 seats with 2 left to go. Tomi was wrong.

abdul muis

@Tomi

In both LG & Samsung MWC 2016 event, they both mention your 150x per day stats as the reason they made the new feature for their phone.

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    Tomi Ahonen is a bestselling author whose twelve books on mobile have already been referenced in over 100 books by his peers. Rated the most influential expert in mobile by Forbes in December 2011, Tomi speaks regularly at conferences doing about 20 public speakerships annually. With over 250 public speaking engagements, Tomi been seen by a cumulative audience of over 100,000 people on all six inhabited continents. The former Nokia executive has run a consulting practise on digital convergence, interactive media, engagement marketing, high tech and next generation mobile. Tomi is currently based out of Hong Kong but supports Fortune 500 sized companies across the globe. His reference client list includes Axiata, Bank of America, BBC, BNP Paribas, China Mobile, Emap, Ericsson, Google, Hewlett-Packard, HSBC, IBM, Intel, LG, MTS, Nokia, NTT DoCoMo, Ogilvy, Orange, RIM, Sanomamedia, Telenor, TeliaSonera, Three, Tigo, Vodafone, etc. To see his full bio and his books, visit www.tomiahonen.com Tomi Ahonen lectures at Oxford University's short courses on next generation mobile and digital convergence. Follow him on Twitter as @tomiahonen. Tomi also has a Facebook and Linked In page under his own name. He is available for consulting, speaking engagements and as expert witness, please write to tomi (at) tomiahonen (dot) com

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